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Dear David


At the suggestion of a friend of mine, I thought I'd try an 'advice/opinion' column here on Good Things by David as a way to answer some of your questions.  On any given month I get many emails from individuals asking about this or that, which I try my best to answer in a timely manner.  Many of those queries leave me thinking that a lot of my readers would benefit from sharing this back & forth dialogue.  Why not do it in an open forum here on the blog and have you see what others are asking?


I don't pretend to be an expert, but I do have opinions, I do have experience and knowledge in areas that I blog about (otherwise I wouldn't be doing so) and I think I have an eye for spotting a "Good Thing" when I see it.  

Let's keep this fun, informal and open.  I don't want anyone to feel inhibited or shy about asking questions regarding the home, baking, cooking, collecting, style, etc.  

A Jadeite Basket Mystery
Can I Freeze Iced Cookies?
Can I Freeze Royal Icing?
Do I Keep My Depression Glass?
Mosser Glass Cake Stands vs. L.E. Smith Glass Cake Stands
What is Dutch-process Cocoa Powder?

Comments

  1. Hi David I just had a question on what I believe to be a very rare jadeite dish that I plan to sell on ebay. My mom bought it a long time ago from an antique store. We have never been able to find one like it, even on line. I was wondering if you had any knowledge on it? It is a nutmeg jar with a hand painted nutmeg on it. I'd like to send a picture nut don't know how.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Christy,

    If you can find a way to upload the photo to your computer, send it to me via email as an attachment.

    Send to: goodthingsbydavid@gmail.com

    I can't wait to see that nutmeg jar!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is a little off the subject. Although it is a question. I'm curious to what types of TV programs, movies and books you enjoy? I'm a big PBS fan and enjoy movies and have a pretty good collection of cookbooks and novels. I plan to purchase the Downton Abby series. So....... What's your favorites?

    ReplyDelete
  4. OK, Coco, I'm not a big TV program watcher! Believe it or not, it's rare for me to turn on the television. If I do, I like to watch cooking shows (big surprise).

    As for books, WELL, that is a whole different thing! I read every single day without fail. I'm a big fan of mystery/thrillers, Victorianesque, some sci-fi, and the classics. For that, I would have to email you. The list is TOO long!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wonderful! You know I never get tired of having a good book to read. I keep one on the night stand. I still go to the library in town.
    I would love to hear some of you're suggestions. Please e mail.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I will email you with my favorites when I get a moment!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi, I hope you can answer my question. I have two containers of what looks like a clear gel. On the top it says, "Boo" by Martha by Mail. Any idea what it might be and what it would be used for? Thank you. Pat

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pat,

      Without having a picture of what you have, it sounds like something from one of the Martha by Mail Halloween kits. You can always send me photos to my email address (click on the link in the sidebar, upper right of the blog) so that I can ask around.

      Best,
      David

      Delete
  8. David, I just want to tell you how much I love your posts. They are always so pretty and well written. I usually learn something. I wish you a Merry Christmas and very prosperous new year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Brenda!! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you and your family! 🎄🎄🎄

      Delete
  9. Hello -- I lost a good deal of my collection of Danish Fern in an earthquake and I'm looking for some replacements. Any good sources? Thanks...Tom

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous, I would say to register that pattern through Replacements Ltd. so that you get email updates on available pieces as they get them. Also, check eBay and even Etsy. People occasionally put Danish Fern up for sale.

      I'm so sorry that you lost those pieces!

      Delete
  10. Hi David,
    I'm making your heirloom cookies and the dough is quite dry and crumbly. I don't know how to fix it. Can you please help?
    Joelle

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Try adding an extra egg to it, but do it in the mixer until it comes together.

      Delete
    2. Thank you so much! I already pulled the dough out and it's in the refrigerator. Would adding water help? Thank you for the advice!
      Joelle

      Delete
    3. Joelle, don't add water to the dough. The egg should be enough to bring it together.

      Delete
  11. Dear David, who makes those lovely cup/saucer on ur 2 pics above? The one looks like MS drabware which unfortunately had been discontinued by the time I found it. I love the shape of those sets, large "real" cups. tks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are exactly correct. Those are indeed, Wedgwood drabware from the Martha by Mail catalog. They're such a pleasure to use, and easily accessible these days!

      Delete
  12. What kind of food colouring do you use in your royal icing?
    Liquid or paste?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prefer to use the paste/gel type by Americolor or Ateco. They give consistent results every time.

      Delete
  13. David,

    Just wanted to leave a note for you that since we last e-mailed about Wedgewood Drabware several months ago, I have been able to build up a place setting of eight with dinner, salad, cup/saucer, berry bowl and rimmed soup bowl. As I expected, just beautiful, classic and can be used for formal or casual.

    In addition, your information on Jadeite has been educational as well. To that end, the Fire King Jadeite Restaurant line is something that I've started as well.

    Wondering if it would be interesting if you did a post on the history of Fire King and their lines of dinnerware etc. throughout the 40s, 50s and 60s etc.? As I perform my own research, I did not realize the scale and offerings that they had.

    Thanks again,
    Geoff

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great, Geoff!!! I'm so glad you like drabware and have begun a good collection. Enjoy it!

      Oh, doing the history of Fire King might prove to be a monumental project. Maybe someday!

      Best,
      David

      Delete
    2. Dear David, I just discovered your website/Instagram while looking for an old Martha Steward Turkey Hill story. During this time of pandemic, it is comforting to stroll down memory lane by looking at some of our favorite moments...such as Martha's time at Turkey Hill. I love your website and posts and wish that I had discovered them years ago! But, the content is helping to lift my spirits now, and I thank you for that!

      Delete
    3. Thank you for reading along! I'm glad you're here, Shirley. I hope that you and your family are safe and healthy.

      Delete
    4. Dear David, I love your website!! Just like one of the previous comments, the content lifts my spirits, too!
      Thank you, Glenda

      Delete
  14. Any idea where I could find a 3 gallon Martha Stewart apothecary jar?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Came across your blog from searching up what is a spring house, which you helped me understand it better thanks! saludos from TEXAS OOOORRAAhHH!! (finna explore your blog now :) )

    ReplyDelete

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