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The Never-Ending Snow

We can't seem to get a break from the snow here in the Northeast.  As much as people like the idea of snow and how it looks in the landscape, I assure you that it can be rather tiresome after a few days of it.  The month of February has been especially snowy and brutally cold for a lot of us in this part of the country.  With single digit temperatures and blustery days, it's been an effort just to get out the front door!  

In years past I've shown you photographs of what our home looks like with the first snowfall or a subsequent one, so I am a bit late in providing those for you.  I'm not sure if it was the cold or what, but I hadn't been in the mood to take pictures of the outdoors until a few days ago.

Friends of mine on the west coast can boast of warm temperatures, sunny skies and outdoor activities that they're enjoying right now, but I say to them, empathize with our 'being done with winter' sentiments here on the east coast, even if it is just for one moment.  OK, enough of my grievance with the cold and the snow, and let's get to the photos!

A snow-covered bench is surrounded by complete silence as I make my way outdoors.


It is rather beautiful to walk through the landscape when nothing is stirring and the last snowflake has fallen on the ground.  As I make my way out of the mudroom/office area and onto the back porch, I check to see how thick the snow is on the steps.  A good gauge for me is the teak bench which sits next to the well right across from the kitchen window.

Thick boots (my Wellies are just right), a heavy wool coat, a hat, a scarf and a pair of gloves is absolutely necessary right now.  You can't walk out the front door when it's in the single digits without any type of protection.

I never get tired of the view in front of the house.  A meandering driveway, an old Pennsylvania stone barn and perhaps some deer in the nearby woods if we're lucky.  Can you just make out the steps leading up to the driveway?  It's pretty bad when you can't even see them.

The front porch is the first thing to clear off before shoveling the walkway.  Just past that small hill is a fox den and the home of our resident groundhog, Henry.  I was telling a reader that we're counting the days until he emerges from his little den.  We'll see!

What driveway?  Yes, it's there, but it's completely covered in powdery snow.  

The stone barn abuts the sloping hill which leads up to the large meadow.  As soon as the temperatures go up a bit, one will undoubtedly hear the dripping sounds of melting snow coming off the rooftop and front porch.

Those small tracks were probably made by one of the foxes or by some deer.  It's funny to see them using the trails that we use.

The three bay facade of the stone barn is very simple and unassuming.  A two bay hay loft is what's found on the second floor and the uppermost floor is a storage area which has odds and ends.

This set of stairs leading up to the field is barely visible, but thankfully on this particular day they were not icy.  

Built in 1830 of local stone, this type of Pennsylvania stone barn is known as a bank barn.  Bank barns were built against a sloping hill to take advantage of the landscape.  If you're interested in seeing what it looks like on the inside, click here.

The edge of the meadow clearly shows a bleak landscape, but take my word for it, in a matter of weeks after we've thawed from winter's grip, everything will transform into a verdant panorama.

I was hoping to catch a glimpse of some deer, but alas, they were not in the area.

The tall evergreens look beautiful with their snow-covered boughs.

The Barn.


As I make my way back home in this photograph I can't help but wonder when we'll see the little snowdrops that honor us with their presence in the early spring.  I'm thinking of how I want to arrange them on my table and in my kitchen.  Their beguiling scent is unlike any other.  

In the meantime, I hope all of you are keeping warm wherever you may live. Don't worry, spring is right around the corner along with better temperatures, sunny days and the cheerful appearance of the wildlife.  Are you ready for spring?  I know I am!

Cheers,

David

Comments

  1. Beautiful. But yes enough already! It is lovely to see when sitting inside with a cup of hot coco and a fire. But I'm so looking forward to spring and seeing the tulips and daffodils! Thank you david for the wonderful photos.❄

    ReplyDelete
  2. Exactly Co.Co!


    By the way, thank you for that wonderful photograph of your snow-covered yard that you sent me. I agree that snow is best enjoyed while inside with a cup of tea and a good book. I can't wait for our daffodils too!

    Best,
    David

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh David....we never get snow at all, so you are getting our lot too. Thank you for sharing - your photos are beautiful without being over-staged - lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great pictures David! Do you walk your trails during winter? That would be a nice photo op if you can do it. Can't wait for spring too, have a good one!

    ReplyDelete
  5. @Phil, I think we did get your share of snow and then some! As I said: "I'm over it.". Thanks for the compliment. I try my best to take decent photos. :)

    @Nancy, you know I haven't taken a walk through the trails this winter. Right now the snow is incredibly solid/crusty/slippery, so I won't even try to venture out onto the trails until we get warmer temperatures.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We just received much more here in Ohio over night. It's beautiful but I'm ready for t shirts and flip flops. Can wait to get out in the flower beds and plant. The garden and flower catalogs are starting to come in the mail. I find myself waiting to see the next one to come. It's exciting to think of what to plant this spring. 🐝🌺

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm excited too!!! Let's bring on spring already!

    I can't wait. Trust me. :)

    ReplyDelete

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