Monday, May 4, 2015

Patchwork Rose Quilt Cookies

Patchwork Rose Quilt Cookies make wonderful gifts for any mother this Mother's Day.  Many moms adore roses in any form, so for all of the fantastic mothers out there who like roses just as much as my mother does, bake and decorate a few marvelous sugar cookies to make her feel extra special this holiday.  The homespun quality of these "patchwork" cookies will have you wanting to create them for other occasions besides Mother's Day.  Think weddings, birthday parties, art gallery receptions or bake sales and tag sales. Arrange them on a dessert buffet in a patchwork pattern for an eye catching presentation.


What I love about the Rose Quilt Cookies is the simple color scheme.  You can, of course, pick and choose the colors for your roses according to taste.  The idea is to create custom, one-of-a-kind patchwork cookies that will charm the recipient.  Another good thing about these little sweet edibles is that they are a cinch to make.

Let me show you how!

Ingredients & Tools
  • Sugar Cookies
  • Royal Icing
  • Scalloped Square 3" cookie cutter
  • Gel Paste Food Colors: red-red, pink, leaf green, burgundy
  • Piping Tips #2, #3, open star #13, leaf-tip #65
  • Piping Bags, Squeeze Bottles, adapters & couplers
Note-- you will need: stiff royal icing to pipe rosettes and leaves; flooding-consistency royal icing to flood white bases and for dot accents around the bases. 

The first order of business is to flood the bases of your square, baked cutout sugar cookies with plain white royal icing.  Let the icing dry completely before proceeding in order to minimize color bleeding.

Rosette Technique:

A.  With the #13 open star tip, begin piping stiff royal icing in light pink, red or pale burgundy into rosettes.  Holding the piping at almost a 90 degree angle, pipe icing with gentle pressure, and lift the bag.
B.  While still piping, immediately begin to move the icing up and over in a circular motion.
C.  Continue to pipe a circle around the middle, working outward.
D.  Stop the pressure and release the icing.

Continue piping rosettes in one color, leaving gaps between each rosette.  You will go back and fill those spaces in.

You will immediately notice those little end peaks on your rosettes, which should be corrected.  Using a toothpick or an icing pick, gently push the peaks back into the icing.  Done!

If you're unsure of your piping technique, use a small plate to practice on before doing it on the cookies.  Believe me, these are worry-free and completely forgiving when it comes to technique.

With a different color, pipe more rosettes to fill in the gaps.  You can pipe them wherever you see fit.  Remember, this is homespun "patchwork" so perfection is not what we're after.  

Using the leaf tip #65, pipe small leaves here and there to make a pretty bouquet.


Patchwork Borders:

A.  Pipe dots on each corner of the flooded base, making sure that the dots adhere to the ends.  Find the midpoint of each side and pipe another dot.
B.  Pipe another dot midway between each gap.
C.  Again, pipe another dot between each gap.  You can see that what we're doing here is making sure each side is even.
D.  You can leave the borders like this, or you can pipe a contrasting color to fill in the gaps even more.  This gives nice visual contrast to the cookies.


Done!

Let the icings dry before packaging them up in clear cellophane bags or arranging them in a "patchwork pattern" on platters.



How simple was this?  I guarantee that you will love making a set of these cookies because of the joy they will bring to the mother(s) in your life.  Again, think outside the box and make them for any special occasion that requires some flowers.  Choose your favorite colors and pipe away those tiny rosettes with ease.  It's the kind of cookie design that you will want to make time and time again.  

Have fun baking and decorating!

4 comments:

  1. Thank you Lora! These were a lot of fun for me. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your unending patience and steady hand are amazing David.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks so much Phil! A steady hand is a good thing to have when decorating cookies. I have my moments. :)

    ReplyDelete

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