Skip to main content

MARIAGE FRÈRES



Having tea in the afternoon is something I do every single day.  I don't make a production of setting a table just for this purpose, but I do admire the 'art of tea'.  Cultures throughout the world have their rules and etiquette practices when it comes to having tea, and if you partake of this daily ritual, then I'm sure you have your own set ways of enjoying a cup or two.  


Mariage Frères, the renowned French purveyor of fine teas and its accoutrements, is a company that elevates the art of tea to a very high level. I've known about this French institution for some time, but it's only recently that I've taken a moment to delve into their ways of proper tea.

While perusing The Food Lover's Guide to Paris by Patricia Wells, I came across the tea salons & restaurants of Mariage Frères in Paris (they also have a location in Japan).  It was here that the golden rules established by this venerable tea importer caught my attention.  These rules make sense and there is nothing pretentious about them.  

As Henri Mariage, founder of Mariage Frères in 1854, stated: "Tea is a noble beverage.  Preparing it is an art that combines skill and tradition."

If you want to learn how to make proper tea, 
follow this easy tutorial by Mariage Frères. 

Black Teas, Matured Teas, Blue Teas, and flavored teas
  • Pre-heat the teapot, after inserting the tea strainer or filter, * by rinsing it with boiling water.
  • Place a teaspoon of tea (roughly 2.5 g) per cup in the warm strainer* and let it stand for a few moments, allowing the steam to begin developing the leaves' aroma.
  • Pour simmering water on the tea so that all the leaves are covered.
  • Let the tea steep (refer to chart)
  • About 2 minutes for fannings
  • About 3 minutes for broken leaf teas
  • About 5 minutes for whole leaf teas
  • Barely 3 minutes do the first flush Darjeeling (slightly increasing the amount of tea to 3.5 g per cup)
  • 7 minutes for blue teas

It is then essential to remove the strainer or filter*containing the leaves. the tea must then be stired (another important step) and finally poured. Teas from great gardens should not be drunk too hot; let them stand a few moments after steeping, so that the palate can better appreciate the most subtle of fragrances.


White and Green Teas 
  • Pre-heat the pot or chung (cup with cover) as above.
  • Place the appropriate amount of tea per person or cup (refer to chart). Let the tea leaves stand for a few moments to allow the steam to begin developing the aroma.
  • Place the appropriate amount of tea per person or cup (refer to chart).
  • Let the tea steep (refer to chart):
  • For green tea, 1 to 3 minutes
  • For the white tea Yin Zhen, 15 minutes
  • For the white teas Pain Mu Tan, 7 minutes
  • Remove the tea leaves, stir and serve.

* Use a cotton tea filter if the teapot is not equipped with a strainer.

I highly encourage you to visit the Mariage Frères website for products, tutorials and other wonderful things from this French company.

Having tea using my Wedgwood drabware and lemons from my father's trees is pure pleasure.

Comments

  1. I love tea (am enjoying a cup now) what a great post, perfect!

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's wonderful. Jayne, I love tea as well and in fact, we drink it more than we do coffee here at home.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautiful post!

    I enjoy my tea each morning and afternoon, when I have a bit of time, I make a nice tray, sometimes it's just a quick cup. But I look forward to it!

    I was introduced to Mariage Freres by a friend who gifted me a tin or Marco Polo tea, a delightful tea it is! (I've been hooked ever since)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bernie,

    I know that you take your tea very seriously. There's nothing like having a cup in the afternoon. I can't imagine life without it!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thank You for Posting!

Popular posts from this blog

Antique Salt Cellars

There was a time when salt cellars played an important role on the dining table for the host or hostess.  As a result of it being such an expensive commodity several hundred years ago, salt was seen as a luxury and it was the well to do that made salt cellars quite fashionable & a status symbol for the home.  A single salt cellar usually sat at the head of the table and was passed around throughout the meal.  The closer one sat to the salt cellar, the more important one was deemed by the head of the household.  Smaller cellars that were more accessible and with an open top became a part of Victorian table settings.  Fast forward to the 20th century when salt was no longer a luxury and when anti caking agents were added to make salt free-flowing, and one begins to see salt cellars fall out of fashion.  Luckily for the collector and for those of us who like to set a table with Good Things , this can prove to be a boon. Salt cellars for the table come in silver, porcelain, cut glass

How to Paint a Chair

If you have ever felt the need to spruce up a set of chairs or give them a new look, why not try a little bit of paint?  Our tastes in decor and color will probably alter throughout our lives, and at some point, we may find ourselves wanting to change the look of our furniture without having to spend a lot of money.  That's where a few handy tips, some tools from the hardware store, and good-quality paint come in handy.   I know I'm not alone in paying visits to local antique shops, antique fairs and flea markets, and falling in love with pieces of furniture that would be perfect if they were just a different color.  You don't have to walk away from a good purchase simply because it's the wrong color.   My dear friend, Jeffrey, is forever enhancing his home with collectibles from flea markets and tag sales.  However, certain items aren't always up to Jeffrey's tastes when he brings them home.  He is the type of person who won't hesitate to chang

Collecting Jadeite

With its origins dating back to the 1930s, jadeite glassware began its mass production through the McKee Glass Co. in Pennsylvania. Their introduction of the Skokie green & Jade kitchenware lines ushered in our fascination with this jade color.  Glassmakers catered jadeite to the American public as an inexpensive alternative to earthenware soon after the Depression, both for the home and for its use in restaurants.  The Jeanette Glass Company and Anchor Hocking introduced their own patterns and styles, which for many collectors, produced some of the most sought after pieces.  Companies marketed this beautiful glass under the monikers of jadite , jadeite , jade glass , jad-ite , jade-ite , so however you want to spell it, let it draw you in for a closer look.  If you want a thorough history of the origins of jadeite, collectors’ pricing, patterns & shapes (don’t forget the reproductions in 2000), I highly suggest picking up the book by Joe Keller & David Ross called, Jadei